Delta System    5-2018  

     Encore Recycling (Salinas),   Command Packaging (Vernon)       Rodeo Plastic Bag & Film Inc (Texas}   Revolution Bag  

Victor's Proposal: Victor predicted  .. Plan  .. Proposal   5-18-2018
Purpose: Secure the Source,  Efficiency to reduce the Cost.
Encore consumed 10000mt/yr Ag films currently, have strong Support in their Delta Group,
with powerful influence in Local Ag Film Collection/Facility (20000mt/yr) & unique washing/pelletize ability.
Co-op;  have Encore to purchase AG Films (special with Drip Tape) for Millwood ,  Target amount.... 10000mt/yr, minimum  5000mt/yr.
              ave cost:  0.075/lb, $3000/container,  250cntr/yr, 250/12= 20.8cntr/mo.>> 20cntr/mo., 3000x20 = $60K
                              L-Freight:  650/load...  650 x 20  =  $13000/mo     Misc. $2000/mo                 sub-total:   60K + 13K  + 2K  =  $75K
                              O-Freight:  $750/cntr   750 x 20  =  $15000/mo     Misc. $2000/mo                 sub-total:              15K  + 2K  =  $17K   
**Concern:           1. How much & where Encore to get profit     2. How much & where Millwood retain the profit.
                               Baler: for Drip Tape..   Mobile Baler    




Aviv.... General Mgr,    Pete... President         Whitley..... ?
 Plastic bag ban paying off big for Salinas        By:  Monica Jacquez
Posted: Feb 04, 2015 09:20 AM PST

Located off Espinosa Road in Salinas sits mountains of plastic ag waste from farms around the Central Coast.
To Aviv Halimi who runs Encore Recycling, all that trash is a treasure waiting to happen.
About two years ago (2015-2 report) the company moved into the old Firestone Business Park in Salinas.
The plant recycles more than 15 million pounds (500x15=7500tons) of plastic agriculture waste per year,
and it's all used to make reusable plastic bags.


"There's an estimated 100 to 150 million pounds of ag waste generated in California alone every year.
Of which we estimate about 40 to 50 million just in the Salinas/Watsonville area," said Halimi.   (30% of Calif. ???)

Pacific Gold Farms farmer Paul Frost manages 500 acres of strawberries in the Salinas Valley.
Through the growing cycle he uses plastic sheets to keep the fruit clean.
That's 500,000 pounds of plastic per year that used to go to the landfill.

Frost said, "As the plants grow during the year they'll get to be this size and
there's no way to cut it and get it cut off in one piece so we can't put it back on next year's crop. It would be impossible to reuse."

Not anymore – Encore Recycling takes all the old plastic, cleans it, melts it down - and then ships it to
Southern California where sister company Command Packaging converts it into reusable plastic bags.

"We don't have to take it to the landfills anymore, and it was very expensive," said Frost.

Frost said it used to cost his company $50,000 a year to dump all his plastic waste. But farmers aren't the only people benefiting from this new technology. Over the past two years, the recycling operation has brought in 500 jobs.
Salinas Mayor Joe Gunter said it all adds up to a big boost for the local economy.
A new way for the city to embrace its ag roots and reap the rewards.

"When you're employing 500 people and they spend money in the surrounding Monterey County economy,
that's huge," said Gunter. "They are buying houses, they're buying cars, they're going to the grocery store to shop.
They're buying gasoline for their car. Everything they do affects our economy."

And in this case the environment too! Keeping tons of plastic waste out of landfills, and putting it into the hands of shoppers in the form of reusable bags.    Currently 84 businesses in Monterey County use the reusable plastic bags.



Encore              340 El Camino Real      Salinas, Monterey County 93901





Delta boosts its California recycling stake with acquisitions       February 9, 2018     Jim Johnson



Feb 9, 2018
Delta Plastics of the South had been shipping used agricultural products to its facilities in Arkansas and Texas,
and was seeking a California location. Its acquisition of Encore Recycling and Command Packaging gives it a California site.
Delta Plastics of the South LLC, which already has been ramping up to expand agricultural plastic recycling in California,
 is now acquiring a significant recycler in the state.

Stuttgart, Ark.-based Delta Plastics acquired Command Packaging LLC and its sister company, Encore Recycling LLC, in a move that gives it both recycling and new product manufacturing capacity.

"It was just a natural fit," Delta Plastics CEO Sean Whiteley of Delta Plastics said in a Feb. 9 interview.
"We share the same core operating philosophies and visions around sustainable, closed-loop plastic manufacturing.
Closed-loop green manufacturing is a passion for both organizations."

A key component of the deal is the Encore Recycling unit located in Salinas, Calif., which Delta says is
"California's only manufacturer of high-quality post-consumer recycled polyethylene film-grade resin."

Encore Recycling relies on used agricultural plastics to serve as a feedstock for
Command Packaging to then make new products, including plastic bags for the food service, grocery and retail markets.

Los Angeles-based Command Packaging's bags are thicker than the typical grocery store bags and designed for multiple uses.

"Demand for high-quality sustainable plastic packaging is increasing. It became obvious we needed a growth partner to accelerate our expansion and meet the growing demands of the markets we serve,"
CEO Pete Grande of Command Packaging and Encore Recycling said in a statement.

Command Packaging Command Packaging uses recycled content from sister company Encore Recycling to
produce thick, reusable plastic bags.
Grande talked about his plans for Command Packaging and Encore Recycling in 2013 when he was planning his new recycling venture. Grande explained the thicker plastic bags, at 2.25 mils, would be able to carry more weight and designed to be reused dozens and dozens of times. The thicker bags are a response to a California law that banned single-use bags.

Encore Recycling, like Delta Plastics, relies on used PE agricultural film for its feedstock.

The merger of the two operations means Delta Plastics can kick-start its efforts to expand ag film recycling in California.
The company has been collecting agricultural film in the state for nearly two years and sending it back to Arkansas for reprocessing.

But during this time, the company ultimately decided it should establish additional West Coast operations to enable processing and manufacturing closer to collection to be more sustainable.

Delta Plastics had been in final negotiations with a few California locations for development of a new reprocessing site,
but now will be able to use and expand Encore Recycling's location.
Delta Plastics will install additional new equipment to wash and reprocess used film to go along with Encore's existing operations.

"It will be separate. It will be managed separately and it will be tracked separately," Whitely said of the two portions.

Delta Plastics said an earlier $3 million grant the company received from the California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery to create a recycling operation is still in place.

The operations are expected to ultimately create at least 40 million pounds of clean resin each year from the Salinas location.
 "We're very excited about the combination of our businesses," Whiteley said.

Last year (2017) Delta Plastics indicated it was collecting about 4 million pounds of dirty plastic each month in California.
That translates into about 2 million pounds (50%) of recyclable material due to the high level of dirt contamination.

Encore Recycling has 125,000 square feet under roof, enough room to greatly expand processing at that location over time,
Whiteley said.
Encore Recycling's current production is used for "dozens of applications, such as
new agricultural plastics, composite lumber, retail carry out bags, and even our own line of reusable bags," the company said.

Grande said his company also likes the idea of expanding Command Packaging's production to existing Delta facilities in Arkansas and Texas. Delta Plastics, just last year, acquired Rodeo Plastic Bag & Film Inc. of Mesquite, Texas.
Rodeo makes industrial plastic sheeting and bags.

"Merging the two companies together creates impressive synergies for both companies," Grande said in his statement.

Whiteley said the new deal is a culmination of talks that actually go back more than three years.

8-26-2013

County Staff Play Crucial Role Bringing New Jobs to the Area
Thanks to efforts by staff within
the Resource Management Agency,
Environmental Health Bureau of the Health Department, and
Economic Development,
a huge plastics recycling center operated by Encore Recycling is expected to open in October
 at the Firestone Business Park south of Salinas
.
The center is expected to employ up to 100 people next year,
with plans to ultimately hire 300 - 500. Its focus is recycling agricultural plastics from growers
and recycling it into useable products, diverting an estimated 135 tons of plastic from landfills.
“It is just the kind of business the area wants to attract, says Economic Development Director
David Spaur.
“It’s a marriage of agriculture with green technology,’ says Spaur. “And the success of the
deal is owed in large part to inter-agency cooperation and a good working relationship with
the company to meet its needs.”
That inter-agency cooperation resulted in a fast-track process which cut in half the time needed
for the company to receive its permits. Encore’s General Manager Aviv Halimi agrees that
the cooperative efforts made all the difference.
“The Monterey County staff has been instrumental in keeping the Encore facility on track and
on schedule,” explains Halimi. “As with any permitting process, there were obstacles to
overcome, but the staff took the time to genuinely understand our business, our timeline, and
what needed to be done to overcome the obstacles before us. Without the support of the
Monterey County staff and their assistance in fast-tracking our permitting process, our facility
would not have been possible in Monterey County.”
A core team of county staff worked on the Encore project, taking it from receipt of the application
in May to its first hearing in July and permits with conditions issued in PLN130335.
Team members included:
   Marti Noel, Resource Management Agency Dan Lister (Land Use Technician - Planning)
   Bronwyn Nielson (Environmental Health Bureau – Health Department)
   Raul Martinez (Public Works)
   Bob Schubert (Senior Planner-Planning)

The Encore project got the ‘fast-track treatment’ due to its economic benefits.
 That streamlining effort included setting up and waving the fee for a pre-application meeting which brought
all the departments and agencies involved in the permit process together to tell the applicant
up front what would be needed for the permit process and how to keep the process moving quickly.
Also keeping the project on the fast track,
Deputy Building Official Mark Setterland and
Office Assistant Maria Sanchez from Building Services coordinated with Planning staff to issue
a simple over-the-counter building permit to allow Encore to begin construction and stay on schedule.
Those involved say they are pleased with being able to move the project so quickly, and that
the Encore project is hopefully the first of many fast-track projects.
Agricultural plastics like the above sheeting under strawberries will be recycled at Encore
rather than thrown away. With many ag companies already agreeing to participate in recycling,
Encore anticipates hiring up to 500 employees.
“There is a streamlining task force that meets and is working to make more permits go as
quickly and smoothly as this one,” says County Senior Planner Bob Schubert.

Publication date: 09/17/2013
Author: Heather Caliendo
Copyright: www.plasticstoday.com


Bag bans inspire Command Packaging to innovate
Plastic grocery bags are certainly a hot button issue. When there is a material being banned
in certain parts of the world, it’s obviously going to stir some emotions. But it can also do
something else; sometimes it forces companies to evolve and become creative in ways they
might not have anticipated.
California-based Command Packaging CEO Peter Grande told PlasticsToday that while bag
bans caused the plastic bag manufacturer to lose some business to paper, they also saw the
bigger picture and an opportunity to offer a new solution to a “very controversial and complex
topic.”
“Bag bans have allowed us to look at a problem through a different set of lenses and create
a solution that will really help address the problem,” he said. “We knew if we could create a
better solution, it would have a positive impact on our company in the long run.”
After studying the issues, Grande said that it became obvious that plastic bags needed to be
manufactured from recycled plastics. Since recycling of plastic film and bags in the U.S. is
“inadequate,” he said that became the first challenge the company needed to solve.
The company learned in its analysis that a sustainable business model required recycling
plastic with a purpose and not just recycle for the sake of recycling.
Grande said that one of Europe’s solutions was to create a closed-loop system using agricultural
plastic from fruit and vegetable growing regions and re-purposing the recycled plastic
into the raw material used to produce grocery bags. The model made so much sense to
Grande that Command Packaging chose to invest its own money in the European technology
so the company could recycle agricultural plastic and implement the closed-loop model in
California. Command Packaging is the first U.S. company to adopt this European recycling
model, Grande said.
“The immediate purpose of recycling agricultural plastic is to make the grocery sack of the
future that is an affordable reusable bag that can be manufactured in the U.S. from locally
recycled plastic and is recyclable at the end of life,” he said. “The result of European regulation
was the creation of a sustainable business model which meant European bag producers
were able to survive if they evolved away from single-use virgin plastic bags.”
Command Packaging recently announced the opening of Encore Recycling.
The new 200,000-sq-ft agricultural plastic recycling facility in Salinas, CA
is scheduled to begin operations in October 2013.
Encore Recycling will immediately add 40 manufacturing jobs in an area of California the
company says has been hard hit by the economic downturn. In 2014, the company will employ
more than 100 full-time workers and plans to grow to a staff of nearly 500 full-time employees.
Lots of California produce is grown in Salinas.

One major California crop is strawberries,
which require a lot of plastic in the growing process. Grande said that Salinas is central to
much of this discarded plastic and that they believe this new recycling facility will provide a
sustainable business model to the on-going environmental problem, while at the same time
provide an economic benefit for both the farmer, the grocer, the consumer, and its employees.

Encore Recycling will partner with growers to collect, wash, and recycle the more than 100
million lb of agricultural plastic that is currently being disposed of in California landfills every
year. Since Command is in the bag business, its primary products produced with the recycled
material will continue to be bags. The facility will turn the plastic into reusable bags called
smarterbags for the California grocery market, which can be reused more than 100 times.
“The reality is that plastic is a necessary part of our everyday lives,” Grande said. “Since
plastic is here to stay we have to stop talking about banning plastic and start talking about
how to take advantage of ‘smarter plastic.’”
Products that are made from “smarter plastic” are products that employ the three “R’s”: reduce,
reuse and recycle. So what Command calls smarterbags are plastic grocery sacks that
are reusable, made from recycled agricultural plastic and can be recycled at the end of life.
“The new products we’re creating and our new Encore-Recycling center in Salinas will ultimately
make us a better company,” he said. “If bag bans served as the catalyst for this improvement,
you could say, in the big picture, the impact of bag bans has been a positive.”

Publication date: 8/20/2013
Author: Steven Pacitti
Copyright: www.plasticsinpackaging.com


California set for Encore performance
A US manufacturer of reusable shopping and restaurant bags has opened a 200,000sqft agricultural
plastics recycling facility - Encore Recycling - in Salinas, California, which will start
operations in October.
Command Packaging is claimed to be the first US company to adopt and implement the successful
European model of closed-loop recycling.
Encore Recycling will partner with growers
to collect, wash, and recycle the more than 100 million pounds (45,359 tonnes) of agricultural
plastics that is currently being disposed of in California landfills every year.
The facility will turn the plastics into reusable bags called smarterbags for the California grocery market.
The facility will create 40 manufacturing jobs in an area of California that has been hard hit
by the economic downturn. In 2014, the company will employ more than 100 full time workers
and plans to grow to a staff of nearly 500 full-time employees.
“Encore Recycling is leading the way to help California create the standard for a sustainable
and closed-loop recycling system throughout the US,” said Pete Grande, chief executive of
Command Packaging and Encore Recycling. “Implementing a sustainable recycling model
that works for the consumer, the grocery store, and the environment, is a win-win for all.
People love plastics. It’s part of our everyday lives. Instead of trying to eliminate it, we need
to create a ‘Smarter’ plastics and Encore is doing that.”
Some large multinationals such as Dole, Driscoll, Pacific Gold Farms, Ramco, and Red Blossom
Strawberries, as well as many independent growers, are working with Encore Recycling
to ensure that their plastics is collected and recycled.
Thomas Flewell of Dole Berry Company said: “Until now, we’ve struggled to find a recycler
large enough to handle the discarded farm plastics we use every year in the Salinas Valley.”


Publication date: 8/14/2013
Copyright: www.recyclingportal.eu


‘Closed Loop’ Recycling Facility for Agricultural Plastic Waste in California
Salinas, California -- Command Packaging, a US manufacturer of reusable shopping and
restaurant bags, has announced the opening of Encore Recycling. The new 200,000 square
foot, state-of-the-art agricultural plastic recycling facility, in Salinas, CA is scheduled to begin
operations in October 2013. Command Packaging is the first US company to adopt and implement
the successful European recycling model. This closed-loop recycling system diverts
discarded plastic away from landfills, where it is used to create other recyclable products.
The CEO of Command Packaging in Vernon, Calif., is moving forward with plans to create
a polyethylene recycling operation that will capture farm waste to create reusable grocery
shopping bags.
Encore Recycling will immediately add 40 manufacturing jobs in October, in an area of California
that has been hard hit by the economic downturn. In 2014 the company will employ
over 100 full time workers and plans to grow to a staff of nearly 500 full-time employees. The
facility will have the ability to recycle more than 100 million pounds of plastic per year.
Closed-loop recycling system
“Encore Recycling is leading the way to help California create the standard for a sustainable
and closed-loop recycling system throughout the US,” Pete Grande, CEO of Command Packaging
and Encore Recycling
said. “Implementing a sustainable recycling model that works for
the consumer, the grocery store, and the environment, is a win-win for all. People love plastic.
It’s part of our everyday lives. Instead of trying to eliminate it, we need to create a “smarter”
plastic and Encore is doing that.”
Encore Recycling will partner with growers to collect, wash, and recycle the more than 100
million pounds of agricultural plastic that is currently being disposed of in California landfills
every year. The facility will turn the plastic into reusable bags called smarterbagsTM for the
California grocery market.
Recycling with a purpose
The agricultural community in the Salinas valley has embraced Encore Recycling’s vision of
‘recycling with a purpose’. Some of the largest multi-national and recognizable names such
as Dole, Driscoll, Pacific Gold Farms, Ramco, Red Blossom Strawberries, as well as many
independent growers, are working with Encore Recycling to ensure that their plastic is collected
and recycled.
“We at Dole Berry Company are exited about participating in Encore Recycling’s agricultural
plastic recycling program. It offers us the unique opportunity to avoid sending approximately
135 tons of agricultural plastic to the landfill”, underlined Thomas Flewell of Dole Berry Company.
“Instead Encore Recycling will process the material for a new use. We anticipate that
participating in the program will result in significant cost savings.”
“Until now, we’ve struggled to find a recycler large enough to handle the discarded farm
plastic we use every year in the Salinas Valley”, explained Casey Bassetti with Red Blossom
strawberries. “Encore’s new state-of-the-art plant is just what we need to help us find a sustainable
solution and improve our environment.”material each year, and Encore Recycling is
gearing up to handle every pound it can get its hands on. Farmers will be able to either drop
off their used plastic at centralized hubs or arrange for collection at an additional charge.
“And so we’re going to recycle with a purpose. The purpose is take things out of the landfill
… that technology allows you to use today to make products that are green and can be
produced in the U.S. and make sense for the customer, which is the grocery store, and the
consumer and the environment and the industry. And that’s the vision and that’s the path,”
Grande said.
Encore expects to start out with 40 workers as production begins in Salinas in October and
the company expects that number to grow to 100 in 2014. Creating 500 jobs in a couple of
years is certainly ambitious, the CEO said, but he believes it can be done.
“Jobs can be created very quickly, good manufacturing jobs, green manufacturing jobs, in the
plastic industry if we’re just willing to do the things that are available today,” he said.
Capturing California’s agricultural plastic waste is one goal, but Grande also is looking elsewhere
to repeat the idea. The Salinas location, he said, could serve as a model to be replicated
in other locations that have agricultural plastic going to landfills in significant amounts.
Dole Berry Co., for example, expects to save money by avoiding disposal of about 135 tons
pounds, of agricultural plastic on an annual basis.
‘‘Instead Encore Recycling will process the material for a new use. We anticipate that participating
in the program will result in significant cost savings,” said Thomas Flewell of Dole
Berry in a statement.
“In talking to the farmers, they’re frustrated because they don’t want to send their plastic to
the landfill and nobody was presenting them with a solution for their problems,” Grande said.
“It all just added up that if we could recycle their plastic, turn that plastic into a raw material to
make our [reusable grocery] carryout bags, we’ve really done something terrific. We’ve created
a closed loop and we’re recycling with a purpose. So that’s become our mantra. We’re
going to be recycling with a purpose.”

Publication date: 8/20/2013
Author: Carol Ryan Dumas
Copyright: www.thecapitalpress.com


New ag plastic recycling center to open in California
Command Packaging, a U.S. manufacturer of reusable shopping and restaurant bags, plans
to open an agricultural plastic recycling center in Salinas in the heart of farming country in
California’s Central Valley.
Encore Recycling, with a new 130,000 square foot, state-of-the-art facility, plans to eventually
recycle virtually all of California’s discarded agricultural plastics, which currently end up in
landfills, said Pete Grande, CEO of Command Packaging and Encore Recycling.
The facility is scheduled to begin operations in October, producing raw product that will be
used to manufacture reusable bags for the grocery industry, he said.
The operation will help meet the need of California’s ag industry, which uses and discards
100 million to 150 million pounds of plastic annually, he said.
It’s good for growers, the ag industry and the environment, Grande said.
Agricultural plastic includes such things as fumigation film, mulch film, drip tape, arbor covers,
film for hoop houses, and processor film,
some with only a one-season use, he said.
Currently there is nowhere for discarded ag plastic to go but the landfill, at a cost of $30 to
$110 a ton, in addition to the labor and transportation costs to get it to the dump. Recycling
offers a good solution for the ag industry, the grocery industry, consumers, and the environment,
he said.
The operation will partner with ag operations such as Dole, Driscoll, Pacific Gold Farms,
Ramco, Red Blossom Strawberries, and independent growers to collect, clean and recycle
ag plastic.
Encore Recycling will begin recycling plastic from a small group of specified but significant
charter clients and grow its capacity quickly.
The company doesn’t plan to charge ag clients to accept the material, but that could change,
Grande said.

Publication date: 7/26/2013
Author: Carlos Nunez
Copyright: www.freshplaza.com


New Plant Aims to Reduce Waste with Help From Ag Industry
A new facility for recycling plastic used in the agricultural industry is set to open later this year
in Salinas. The Encore Recycling facility will take plastic used by the agricultural industry and
turn it into reusable bags for use in grocery stores.
Command Packaging has invested $8 million in the new Encore Recycling facility that is set
to open this October in Salinas, California. Located in one of California’s major agricultural regions,
the plant will take plastic used by California’s growers and recycle the material to make
reusable plastic grocery bags. Command Packaging’s CEO, Pete Grande, said the plant will
be a big step forward in creating a closed loop system that significantly reduces waste.
“The original idea was to take agricultural film and plastic and recycle it into plastic products
for the agricultural industry, and so creating a closed loop environment for growers,” said
Grande. “But we’re going to make reusable grocery bags right now because we feel it’s a big
issue.” High profile bans on plastic bags have been enacted in several cities across the US,
and the issue has drawn much attention. While taking measures to reduce the amount of
waste generated from plastic bags is good for the environment, the toll on grocery stores and
consumers is not insignificant. Grande believes that introducing convenient, reusable bags
will work well for people on either side of the plastic bag ban issue.
“Grocery stores want customers who don’t feel inconvenienced or who feel they’re being
charged extra, and everyone wants to feel they’re doing something good for the environment,”
explained Grande. “So we have a model that recycles plastic into reusable bags that
don’t affect the flow of customers at the checkout line and which are cost-effective for stores.”
The bags are comparable in price to paper bags customers can buy in stores where plastic
bag bans are in place, and their reusable nature makes them better for consumers and for
stores. It’s a way to bridge both sides of the plastic bag debate while taking a large chunk out
of the hundreds of millions of pounds of plastic that’s used every year in California’s agricultural
industry.
“The facility will be able to take up to 100 million pounds of plastic a year, plastic which growers
are happy to get rid of, and turn it into reusable bags,” said Grande. “This state-of-theart
recycling facility will help us with our model that’s right for the environment, good for the
bottom line and won’t hurt consumers.”

Publication date: 8/12/2013
Copyright: www.cawrecycles.org


Encore Recycling Brings Jobs to Salinas
Encore Recycling, a facility that will open this fall in Salinas, will accept agricultural
plastic and recycle it to make reusable shopping bags. It will also bring jobs to Salinas—lots
of jobs.
According to an article in The Contra Costa Times, at least 40 new manufacturing jobs
will be filled in October, increasing to about 100 by next year. Command Packaging
CEO Pete Grande says the company could hire up to 500 employees if it is successful.
The facility will recycle up to 100 million pounds of agricultural plastic each year into
reusable shopping bags.
“The whole vision is to recycle with a purpose,” he said. “We’re going to take this
plastic that growers need to use every year to put food on our table, and instead of
sending it to landfills, we’re going to recycle it.”
Not only does this innovative facility benefit the environment by recycling agricultural
plastic, it is helping to reduce the proliferation of single-use plastic grocery bags by
providing a sustainable, reusable alternative. It’s also benefiting the local community
and economy by providing good, green jobs.
Plastics that will be recycled at the Encore facility will include: irrigation drip tape,
almond film plastic, HDPE plastic grape cover and greenhouse film plastic.


Publication date: 8/14/2013
Author: Recycling Today Staff
Copyright: www.recyclingtoday.com


Command Packaging Opens Recycling Plant in California
Command Packaging, a manufacturer of reusable shopping and restaurant bags, has broken
ground on a 130,000-square-foot agricultural plastic recycling facility in Salinas, Calif. The
facility, being called Encore Recycling, is scheduled to start operations in October 2013.
According to Command, when fully operational Encore Recycling will have the ability to recycle
more than 100 million pounds of plastics per year. Initially, Encore will target plastic scrap
generated from the agricultural sector.
The company expects to add 40 jobs in October. Going further, the company expects to have
more than 100 employees in 2014 and hopes to grow the staff to 500 people.
“Encore Recycling is leading the way to help California create the standard for a sustainable
and closed-loop recycling system throughout the United States,” says Pete Grande, CEO of
Command Packaging and Encore Recycling. “Implementing a sustainable recycling model
that works for the consumer, the grocery store and the environment, is a win-win for all.
People love plastic. It’s part of our everyday lives. Instead of trying to eliminate it, we need to
create a “smarter” plastic and Encore is doing that.”
In a release, Command Packaging says that its Encore Recycling business will partner with
growers to collect, wash, and recycle the agricultural plastics that are currently being disposed.
The facility will recycle the plastic into reusable bags called smarter bags, which will be
used by grocers in the state.
“We have established a hub system where growers can drop their plastic off at one of our
conveniently located drop-off sites where we will bale it and send it to our processing facility in
Salinas,” Grande says.
Grande adds that the types of agricultural plastics to be recycled include fumigation film,
mulch film, drip tubing, hoop housing and processor film.
The company’s new facility will provide complete recycling services, including sorting, shredding,
washing and pelletizing of the material.
For more information:
Gretchen Hydo
Chatterbox Ink
gretchen@chatterboxink.com
Publication date: 8/14/2013
Author: Recycling Today Staff
Copyright: www.recyclingtoday.com
As for quality issues that have plagued the plastics recycling industry, Grande says that quality
problems should not be an issue. “We will only accept specific types of plastic from a selected
list of growers. The list of growers and, eventually, the types of plastics we will accept will grow
in 2014.
“We have to maintain tight controls on the source of plastic we receive to comply with our
stringent chain of custody protocol. This is necessary to ensure that the recycled materials
sent downstream for processing are of the highest quality and consistent.”
While a significant amount of the plastic pellets produced will be used by Command Packaging,
the company also will sell pellets to selected manufacturers as well, Grande notes.

Publication date: 01/02/2013
Author: David Schmalz
Copyright: www.montereycountyweekly.com


Encore launches ag plastic recycling in Salinas,
but green activists wonder why.
On the surface, it sounds like a green dream: take all of California’s ag plastic – the sheeting
that covers the ground or drapes over plants on farms – and divert it from the landfill, recycle
it, create local manufacturing jobs and save businesses money.
Encore Recycling, which kicked off operations in Salinas this last November, is doing all of
those things. But local greens are crying foul, and see an underlying agenda to skirt bag bans
and keep disposable plastic shopping bags king.
If Encore was taking all that ag plastic and recycling it back into ag plastic, local greens would
be cheering, says Matthew Speigl of Sustainable Salinas, who runs that group’s “Bring your
own bag” campaign. But Encore plans to turn them into a trademarked product called smarterbags,
which are thicker than regular plastic bags and can be reused dozens of times.
“We don’t need them taking that plastic and making bags,” Spiegl says. “It’s an unnecessary
product.”
Encore’s parent company, Vernon-based Command Packaging, is a plastic bag manufacturer,
and Peter Grande, who is CEO of both, sees things differently.
Grande says nearly all reusable plastic bags are currently imported from China, which he
sees as a missed opportunity.
“We’re the first in North America, as far as we know, to recycle ag plastic,” Grande says. “Our
goal is to take 150 million tons of ag plastic annually and turn it into reusable bags, diverting
it from the landfill.” 150 million tons is how much ag plastic is laid over California’s fields
every year.
“It’s recycling with a purpose,” he says.
Spiegl thinks that purpose is to maintain the status quo of grocery stores handing out plastic
bags, as smarterbags are “bag-ban compliant,” meaning that they’re at least 2.25 mm thick,
and able to carry 20 pounds at least 100 times – the minimum requirements of most bag bans
across California.
“Grande acknowledges they should be available at the same fee as a paper bag,” Spiegl
says. “Their business model won’t work if people actually reuse these bags.”
Grande says that smarterbags aren’t available locally just yet, but he is in negotiations with
grocers. He also has plans for Encore to ramp up: They’ve already hired 20 local employees,
and hope to reach 40 soon.
And while currently Encore’s facility only creates plastic pellets that are then shipped to Vernon,
he hopes to set up a manufacturing facility in Salinas.
“So far the employees we’ve hired are terrific,” Grande says. “They’re focused on making a
difference. They see how this all fits together.”

Publication date: 12/02/2013
Copyright: www.renttv.com


Command Packaging Encore Recycling Facility
Encore Recycling Inc signed a long-term lease for 124.8k sf of industrial space at the Firestone Business Park in Salinas.
The recycling company is a newly formed subsidiary of Vernon-based Command
Packaging, a privately owned maker of plastic and reusable shopping and restaurant bags, as
well as a recycler of plastics.

Encore Recycling will be utilizing three suites within the Firestone Business Park to
recycle agricultural plastics into reusable plastic bags known as Smarterbags, which will be manufactured by Command.

Reportedly, the space could eventually house as many as 500 workers.
Greg Findley and Daniel Vorhies with Cassidy Turley
teamed up to represent the tenant and the landlord,   FBC LLC, in the transaction


Publication date: 8/16/2013
Author: Bobby Elliott
Copyright: www.resource-recycling.com


Plastic film recycling plant to open in California
Capitalizing on the recent flurry of single-use plastic bag bans in the state of California, Command
Packaging is preparing to open a 200,000-square-foot ag-plastic film recycling facility
in Salinas to produce reusable shopping bags.
Doing business under the name Encore Recycling, the plant will begin operations in October
2013. According to a company press release, Encore Recycling will partner with corporate
and independent farmers to collect more than 100 million pounds of agricultural plastic scrap
per year. All of it will go toward making new reusable plastic bags, known as smarterbags, a
focus Command Packaging and Encore Recycling CEO Pete Grande believes will be a sign
of things to come for the state and the entire country.
“Encore Recycling is leading the way to help California create the standard for sustainable
and closed-loop recycling systems throughout the U.S.,” Grande stated in the press release.
“People love plastic. It’s part of our everyday lives. Instead of trying to eliminate it, we need
to create a ‘smarter’ plastic.”
The announcement comes on the heels of sweeping single-use plastic bag bans in counties
and cities throughout the Golden State. Los Angeles was the latest major city to ban
single-use bags, a move that has inspired several other large American cities including New
York and Chicago to consider similar moves. With the need for reusable bags on the rise,
companies like Encore are hoping to become front-runners in the new market.
There are also high hopes for the Salinas site to ease unemployment in the area. An Encore
spokesperson says the site will eventually employ nearly 500 workers once the plant is at full
capacity. For now, the company will add 40 employees when it opens its doors in October
and more than 100 by 2014. Salinas Economic Development Director Jeffrey Weir told Plastics
Recycling Update: “We are absolutely pleased that they received approval from the county.
They are making a huge commitment and investment.” Unemployment in Salinas, according
to Weir, hovers around 25 percent, with much of the economy driven by agriculture.
For more information:
Gretchen Hydo
Chatterbox Ink
gretchen@chatterboxink.com
Publication date: 8/16

Copyright: www.perishablenews.com

Command Packaging Encore Recycling Facility
Encore, the recycling unit of Command Packaging, is constructing a new agricultural plastic waste
recycling facility in Salinas Valley, California, US. The facility will begin operations in October 2013.
The cooperative will initially invest about $8m in the facility. It will further invest $40m to expand the
facility.
The Salinas facility will create about 40 manufacturing jobs at the time of opening. It is expected to
create about 100 and 200 additional jobs by 2014 and 2015 respectively.

The facility will have an annual recycling capacity of 100 million pounds (45,000t) of agricultural plastic
waste.
Details of the Encore Recycling Facility at Salinas
The new recycling facility at Salinas will cover an area of 130,000ft² (12,100m²).
 It will recycle agricultural
plastic waste, such as irrigation drip tape, almond film plastic, high density polyethylene (HDPE)
plastic grape covers and greenhouse film plastic.
The recycled materials will be used to manufacture reusable grocery shopping bags, branded as
‘smarterbags’. The bags will be 2.25mm thick and can handle up to 22 pounds of weight.
The facility will start manufacturing the reusable bags in 2014.
Processing and technology at the Californian recycling plant
“The cooperative will initially invest about $8m in the facility.
 It will further invest $40m to expand the facility.”
The facility will be equipped with high tech machinery and equipment to process plastic waste material.
The agricultural plastic waste will be properly sorted, shredded, washed and pelletised by using
advance technology methods.
The pellets will be sent to Command Packaging’s manufacturing plant at Los Angeles, US. The plant
will manufacture the Smarterbags from the pellets.
The facility will implement a European closed-loop recycling system, which will recycle the agricultural
plastic waste into reusable plastic bags. The bags, once disposed of, will be recycled again to form
new plastic materials.
Contractors involved with Command Packaging’s facility
Encore selected the Yolo County Landfill to collect agricultural irrigation tubes and plastic films for
plastic recycling.

The Yolo County Department of Planning & Public Works Integrated Waste Management Division
partnered with Encore Farming Solutions to provide an environmental and economically sustainable
way of recycling the plastic at the plant.
Marketing commentary for Encore Recycling, Command Packaging
Command Packaging, based in the US, is a manufacturer of reusable shopping and restaurant bags.
“Encore is a unit of Command Packaging, providing plastic manufacturing services for the last 24
years.”
Encore is a unit of Command Packaging, providing plastic manufacturing services for the last 24
years. It employs about 300 people. The co-operative also operates a 200,000ft² recycling and manufacturing facility in Vernon, California.
The Encore™ post consumer recycled plastic bags are eco-friendly and biodegradable. The bags can
be recycled, are non-toxic and easy to afford.
More than 100 million pounds of agricultural plastic is currently being disposed of in Californian
landfills. Encore Recycling will partner with a number of companies, such as Dole, Driscoll, Pacific
Gold Farms, Ramco, Red Blossom Strawberries and independent California growers to collect, clean,
wash and recycle the agricultural plastic waste.
For more information:
Gretchen Hydo
Chatterbox Ink
gretchen@chatterboxink.com Copyright:

Publication date: 8/15/2013
Copyright: www.agprofessional.com


New ag recycling facility to open in California
Command Packaging, a U.S. manufacturer of reusable shopping and restaurant bags, announced
the opening of Encore Recycling. The new 130,000 square foot, state-of-the-art
agricultural plastic recycling facility, in Salinas, Calif., is scheduled to begin operations in
October 2013.
Encore Recycling will immediately add 40 manufacturing jobs in October, in an area of California
that has been hard hit by the economic downturn. In 2014 the company will employ
over 100 full time workers and plans to grow to a staff of nearly 500 full-time employees. The
facility will have the ability to recycle more than 100 million pounds of plastic per year.
“Encore Recycling is leading the way to help California create the standard for a sustainable
and closed-loop recycling system throughout the US,” Pete Grande, CEO of Command Packaging
and Encore Recycling said.
“Implementing a sustainable recycling model that works for the consumer, the grocery store,
and the environment, is a win-win for all. People love plastic. It’s part of our everyday lives.
Instead of trying to eliminate it, we need to create a “Smarter” plastic and Encore is doing
that.”
Command Packaging is the first US company to adopt and implement the successful European
recycling model. This closed-loop recycling system diverts discarded plastic away from
landfills, where it is used to create other recyclable products.
Encore Recycling will partner with growers to collect, wash, and recycle the more than 100
million pounds of agricultural plastic that is currently being disposed of in California landfills
every year. The facility will turn the plastic into reusable bags called smarterbags™ for the
California grocery market.
The agricultural community in the Salinas valley has embraced Encore Recycling’s vision of
‘recycling with a purpose’. Some of the largest multi-national and recognizable names such
as, Dole, Driscoll, Pacific Gold Farms, Ramco, Red Blossom Strawberries, as well as many
independent growers, are working with Encore Recycling to ensure that their plastic is collected
and recycled. “We at Dole Berry Company are exited about participating in Encore Recycling’s agricultural
plastic recycling program.
It offers us the unique opportunity to avoid sending approximately 135 tons of agricultural
plastic to the landfill,” Thomas Flewell of Dole Berry Company said. “Instead Encore Recycling
will process the material for a new use. We anticipate that participating in the program
will result in significant cost savings.”
“Until now, we’ve struggled to find a recycler large enough to handle the discarded farm plastic
we use every year in the Salinas Valley,” Casey Bassetti with Red Blossom strawberries
said. “Encore’s new state-of-the-art plant is just what we need to help us find a sustainable
solution and improve our environment.”

Publication date: 8/15/2013
Author: Jim Johnson
Copyright: www.wasterecyclingnews.com


Command Packaging setting up recycling plant
Peter Grande has a vision to match his name and it involves diverting millions of pounds of
agricultural plastics away from landfills.
The CEO of Command Packaging in Vernon, Calif., is moving forward with plans to create
a polyethylene recycling operation that will capture farm waste to create reusable grocery
shopping bags.
And in the process, he sees the probability of hiring 500 people to close the loop between
California’s farmers and California’s shoppers.
Command Packaging’s Encore Recycling unit expects to begin processing the used agricultural
plastics in Salinas, Calif., in October to create the heavy duty shopping bags that are
designed to be used over and over again.
Made from recycled agricultural film and drip tubing, these are not your father’s grocery bags.
At 2.25 mils thick, the bags will be able to carry up to 22 pounds and designed to be used up
to 125 times during their useful life.
Grande is developing the project after seeing environmentalists and industry argue for years
about the plastic bag issue without really coming up with a solution, he said.
“The discussion of whether we need or want plastics is a moot point. We all need plastics.
We all love plastic. We want plastic. What we need to be talking about is how do we get
smarter plastic? And that’s what we’re all about. We’re going to show the U.S. market that it’s
not about plastic. It’s about how do we get smarter plastic,” he said.
Encore Recycling will use proprietary methods to sort, wash and pelletize the used polyethylene
collected from farms in the state.
Estimates are that farmers in California produce 100 million to 150 million pounds of the
material each year, and Encore Recycling is gearing up to handle every pound it can get
its hands on. Farmers will be able to either drop off their used plastic at centralized hubs or
arrange for collection at an additional charge.
“And so we’re going to recycle with a purpose. The purpose is take things out of the landfill
… that technology allows you to use today to make products that are green and can be
produced in the U.S. and make sense for the customer, which is the grocery store, and the
consumer and the environment and the industry. And that’s the vision and that’s the path,”
Grande said.
Encore expects to start out with 40 workers as production begins in Salinas in October and
the company expects that number to grow to 100 in 2014. Creating 500 jobs in a couple of
years is certainly ambitious, the CEO said, but he believes it can be done.
“Jobs can be created very quickly, good manufacturing jobs, green manufacturing jobs, in the
plastic industry if we’re just willing to do the things that are available today,” he said.
Capturing California’s agricultural plastic waste is one goal, but Grande also is looking elsewhere
to repeat the idea. The Salinas location, he said, could serve as a model to be replicated
in other locations that have agricultural plastic going to landfills in significant amounts.
Dole Berry Co., for example, expects to save money by avoiding disposal of about 135 tons
pounds, of agricultural plastic on an annual basis.
‘‘Instead Encore Recycling will process the material for a new use. We anticipate that participating
in the program will result in significant cost savings,” said Thomas Flewell of Dole
Berry in a statement.
“In talking to the farmers, they’re frustrated because they don’t want to send their plastic to
the landfill and nobody was presenting them with a solution for their problems,” Grande said.
“It all just added up that if we could recycle their plastic, turn that plastic into a raw material to
make our [reusable grocery] carryout bags, we’ve really done something terrific. We’ve created
a closed loop and we’re recycling with a purpose. So that’s become our mantra. We’re
going to be recycling with a purpose.”
For more information:
Gretchen Hydo
Chatterbox Ink
gretchen@chatterboxink.com

                        http://millwoodranch.us/         by: Vic   510-640-4294

(Contact:   )    Delta Plastics       8801 Frazier Pike
 (directions)    Little Rock, Arkansas 72206
Toll-free: 800.277.9172    Office: 501.490.0395     Fax: 501.490.0347    
recycling@deltaplastics.com,    International Inquiries:   international@deltaplastics.com





https://youtu.be/W_p69lCZ4_c?t=12  

Delta Plastics is the leading manufacturer and supplier of irrigation polytube for the agriculture industry. Our products are used to efficiently irrigate a variety of crops, including corn, beans, rice, cotton, sugar cane and other crops.

Delta Plastics BuildingWe operate two facilities: our manufacturing plant in Little Rock, Arkansas, produces Delta Plastics polytube and Revolution Bag can liners; our location in Stuttgart, Arkansas, is dedicated to our extensive recycling operations.

We are proud to be the leader in polytube irrigation, and we are committed to providing efficient irrigation solutions to farmers. From the top-quality materials we use to the personal commitment of our irrigation specialists, every detail helps to bring a high-performance, environmentally responsible irrigation product to our customers.

While our polytube certainly sets us apart, what makes us unique is our focus on recycling.

polypipe in bean fieldDelta Plastics is one of the largest recyclers of heavily soiled and contaminated plastic in the U.S. With our specialized fleet of collection vehicles, we recover, clean and process more than 150 million pounds of material each year. Since 1998, we have diverted 1 billion pounds of waste material from landfills, and we continue to expand our capacity to efficiently handle growing demand.

Our commitment to the environment is the cornerstone of Delta Plastics’ closed-loop production and recycling process. Above all, we strive to provide quality products and sustainable, innovative solutions to your irrigation needs.

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Recent Blog Posts
Important H2O Initiative Information
Jun 29, 2017
As we move through summer and all of the challenges weather brings to the agriculture industry, I wanted to take a moment to share some very important and exciting information. Delta Plastics, along with many other stakeholders, launched the H2O Initiative several years ago. This is a bold move to reduce irrigation water by 20% within the Mississippi Delta by the year 2020. I feel this is an important endeavor and have devoted multiple resources from Delta Plastics to help this happen.
 Read More

Irrigation Water Management for Soybeans
May 09, 2016
By Dr. Jason Krutz
Associate Extension/Research Professor, Mississippi State University

This study by Dr. Krutz outlines how farmers can benefit from combining these scientific scheduling tools on soybean grain yield and irrigation water use for more efficient irrigation and water conservation:   

Target (our Goal, Plan...)   Order (PO, Promise, Paper work),  Goods

Delta make Polytube & recycle it by theirself.  
**Proving....1. Polytube can recycle.  
                    2. They may not interesting to sell their Scrap Polytube,, but off-grade & re-use in overseas ....
                        may have potential.  (vic 3-2018)


Visting (Pic, Price, Stock: Quality/Quantity)    Study:  Market

Thickness 10-15 Mil, Length: 1320-66 0ft.

Communication: Record, Follow-Up)

From: millwoodranch@outlook.com
Sent: Thursday, March 29, 2018 12:14 PM
To: international@deltaplastics.com
Subject: Polytube Plastic Scrap Export

Dear export Manager,
Do you have any plans to export your Polytube Plastic Scrap?
If yes, we like to do some study, to see any feasibility (in total cost, material & logistic)
In order to purchase all your Plastic Scarp (Polyutube) for exporting and/or set up a process plant near-by.

Our export destination…. Thailand, Malaysia, Philippines.  (previous operation in China)

How we can participate with you.
Looking forward to hear your reply.

Regards,
Victor Chiang
Millwood Ranch LLC.
Pacifica, Ca, 94044
millwoodranch@outlook.com